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Unexampled Courage

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Unexampled Courage

27.00
sold out

Please note: the online ordering opportunity for this book is now over. However, a limited quantity will be available for purchase if you’re attending the (sold out) event on Jan.23 at the USC School of Law Auditorium.

How the blinding of Sergeant Isaac Woodard changed the course of America’s civil rights history

On February 12, 1946, Sergeant Isaac Woodard, a returning, decorated African American veteran, was removed from a Greyhound bus in Batesburg, South Carolina, after he challenged the bus driver’s disrespectful treatment of him. Woodard, in uniform, was arrested by the local police chief, Lynwood Shull, and beaten and blinded while in custody.

President Harry Truman was outraged by the incident. He established the first presidential commission on civil rights and his Justice Department filed criminal charges against Shull. In July 1948, following his commission’s recommendation, Truman ordered an end to segregation in the U.S. armed forces. An all-white South Carolina jury acquitted Shull, but the presiding judge, J. Waties Waring, was conscience-stricken by the failure of the court system to do justice by the soldier. Waring described the trial as his “baptism of fire,” and began issuing major civil rights decisions from his Charleston courtroom, including his 1951 dissent in Briggs v. Elliott declaring public school segregation per se unconstitutional. Three years later, the Supreme Court adopted Waring’s language and reasoning in Brown v. Board of Education. Richard Gergel’s Unexampled Courage details the impact of the blinding of Sergeant Woodard on the racial awakening of President Truman and Judge Waring, and traces their influential roles in changing the course of America’s civil rights history.

Join Historic Columbia for “Unexampled Courage: A Conversation with Judge Richard Gergel” on Wednesday, Jan. 23 at the USC School of Law Auditorium.

Gergel is a United States District Judge renowned for presiding over some of the South Carolina’s most contentious lawsuits. On January 23, he will discuss his upcoming book Unexampled Courage: The Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring.

“Gergel is both an astute researcher and an engaging writer, bringing this significant story to vivid life … Civil rights history at its most compelling.” —Kirkus Reviews

Following Judge Gergel’s presentation responses will be offered by Armand Derfner, nationally renowned civil rights attorney, and I.S. Leevy Johnson, decorated lawyer and one of the first African Americans elected to the South Carolina General Assembly since Reconstruction.

Pre-purchased copies of Unexampled Courage will be available for pickup when registrants check-in at the event. A book signing with Judge Gergel will take place during the reception.

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Please note: the online ordering opportunity for this book is now over. However, a limited quantity will be available for purchase if you’re attending the (sold out) event on Jan.23 at the USC School of Law Auditorium.

How the blinding of Sergeant Isaac Woodard changed the course of America’s civil rights history

On February 12, 1946, Sergeant Isaac Woodard, a returning, decorated African American veteran, was removed from a Greyhound bus in Batesburg, South Carolina, after he challenged the bus driver’s disrespectful treatment of him. Woodard, in uniform, was arrested by the local police chief, Lynwood Shull, and beaten and blinded while in custody.

President Harry Truman was outraged by the incident. He established the first presidential commission on civil rights and his Justice Department filed criminal charges against Shull. In July 1948, following his commission’s recommendation, Truman ordered an end to segregation in the U.S. armed forces. An all-white South Carolina jury acquitted Shull, but the presiding judge, J. Waties Waring, was conscience-stricken by the failure of the court system to do justice by the soldier. Waring described the trial as his “baptism of fire,” and began issuing major civil rights decisions from his Charleston courtroom, including his 1951 dissent in Briggs v. Elliott declaring public school segregation per se unconstitutional. Three years later, the Supreme Court adopted Waring’s language and reasoning in Brown v. Board of Education. Richard Gergel’s Unexampled Courage details the impact of the blinding of Sergeant Woodard on the racial awakening of President Truman and Judge Waring, and traces their influential roles in changing the course of America’s civil rights history.

Join Historic Columbia for “Unexampled Courage: A Conversation with Judge Richard Gergel” on Wednesday, Jan. 23 at the USC School of Law Auditorium.

Gergel is a United States District Judge renowned for presiding over some of the South Carolina’s most contentious lawsuits. On January 23, he will discuss his upcoming book Unexampled Courage: The Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring.

“Gergel is both an astute researcher and an engaging writer, bringing this significant story to vivid life … Civil rights history at its most compelling.” —Kirkus Reviews

Following Judge Gergel’s presentation responses will be offered by Armand Derfner, nationally renowned civil rights attorney, and I.S. Leevy Johnson, decorated lawyer and one of the first African Americans elected to the South Carolina General Assembly since Reconstruction.

Pre-purchased copies of Unexampled Courage will be available for pickup when registrants check-in at the event. A book signing with Judge Gergel will take place during the reception.

The program and reception will take place at USC School of Law Auditorium at 1525 Senate Street. Pre-purchased copies of Unexampled Courage  will be available for pickup when registrants check-in at the event. A book signing with Judge Gergel will take place during the reception.